Search This Blog

Saturday, December 9, 2017

mtDNA Marker C16278T Found at the Pre-Columbian Norris Farms Archaeological Site

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1692451/pdf/10091255.pdf
I've perused this paper several times over the years, and decided on a whim to glance at it again, last night. Suddenly, I spotted the shocking, 'smoking gun' (figuratively speaking, of course). I found this paper on ancient DNA, when actually I've been seeking data on the Windover, Florida, Bog site (which I'll never find, since it has been intentionally covered up). So, I have no choice but to settle for what I'm given.
What I noticed this time, in Table 1 of the data, is the DNA marker for the "Other" mtDNA haplogroup found in the pre-Columbian Norris Farms site: a specific marker, "16278", which I happen to share, and which is considered an "extra" in my DNA classification.
As an "extra" it means that most people in my classification (now tentatively, W1-T119C / formerly simply "X" at the beginning when this Human origins research all began, around 2006) -- do not share the marker with me.
Note that "Other" is another designation for "X" -- the unwanted step-child of Native American mtDNA. This paper was originally published in 1999, some years before mtDNA research into Human origins really began to make progress.
Here's the 'smoking gun', figuratively speaking:
It is the marker C16278T, listed beside the specimens designated "other" on the table. (The "Standard" for that marker is T16278C, chemically just the opposite).

Bear in mind that these aren't just lab samples; they're the remains of real, pre-Columbian Human beings who once lived in this land. And I just happen to share that particular genetic anomaly with them -- those "others" -- along with significant identifiers in the rest of their genomes, presumably. I also share with all these individuals, markers 16189C and 16223T.

Oddly and mysteriously, a second marker for "other" was left unidentified and designated simply as "?". My question is: why?

It has absolutely nothing at all to do with one of the two so-called "contaminating sequences" mentioned in the footnote, also found in one of the haplogroup A samples. Because the contaminating sequences are not even listed there (they were in fact quite deliberately omitted from this published data table, presumably for good reason).

I wonder how they determined those omitted (yet worthy of mention) sequences were "contaminating"? And I wonder if it might have been a better idea to list those data results as well? But more so, what's with the "?" ? What data was omitted there, that was not the so-called "contaminating sequences"?

Now for comparison, this is my own personal mtDNA report from James Lick's mtDNA calculator (an excellent tool, by the way). I simply uploaded my raw data into his genius program, and it generated a very conveniently detailed report for me:
I also have markers associated with haplogroup "X". In fact, my defining markers are split almost equally between haplogroups X and W. I got on board with Genographic Project mtDNA research, way back near the beginning of it, circa 2006. My haplogroup classification has since been revised several times over the years, thus:
  • Originally, officially, X (per the Genographic Project)
  • then, officially, W (per FTDNA)
  • tentatively estimated, W1 (per various administrators, genetic genealogists, i.e. unofficial 'authorities' on the subject)
  • tentatively estimated, W1e (again, per various unofficial 'authorities')
  • until presently, W1-T119C is the 'official', 'authorized' verdict. The last is again per FTDNA, following full sequence testing and analysis.

Yet I don't fit perfectly into that group, either; and the only reason there isn't a separate haplogroup classification for my mtDNA type, is because it is so rare.

And while it is true that I definitely have the 119C marker, I still do not fit very well into the European version of that particular clade / sub-clade. As shown both by James Lick and Family Tree DNA, my mtDNA has both, some extras and also some missing markers for that group:


Compared with the RSRS standard.


Compared with the rCRS standard.

Regardless of how you look at it, it all boils down to the same conclusion: I'm very closely related, if not an exact match, to the rare ancient mtDNA found in the Norris site (and probably also to the unfortunately covered-up Windover Bog site), which has been referred to variously as "X" and "Other".

...And which carries so many mysterious question marks, besides the starkly visible one that has tagged them in the c1999 published Norris Farms site data.

Are my ancestors the so-called "Giants" of North America? I know this: my American Indian family members are all unusually tall in height. My own mother and grandmother were both much taller than me, in fact (and I'm average, not short at all).

And that's just one prime example of physical characteristics I've inherited from my maternal lineage. Let us not forget that DNA is a physical characteristic too... Shall we discuss cheekbones? ;)

My DNA is the key that will throw open the closet door to reveal, not skeletons, but the cowardly, greedy, selfish -- real -- "frauds", in the whole "wannabe" controversy.


My maternal grandmother's testimony, in her letter to me. (This is not the whole letter, only the relevant part.) I still have the letter.


My original certificate, issued to me by the Genographic Project. I still have it.


On Mitosearch, although they have me labeled "Not Tested" for HVR2 mutations -- I was indeed tested, so they just need to update that. My HVR2 markers are listed in the FTDNA data tables above.

This chart reports two "exact" (i.e. zero genetic distance) matches for me, who both share the same common ancestor (an "adoptee" mentioned previously). They're no longer listed as "exact" on FTDNA (because, although very close, they're not really exact matches for me).

It shows a total of 25 of the closest matches to me (including myself), in their database. As you can see, some of my closest matches are haplogroups X. Variations of X shown here, are found in Europe, while I am related to the American line. Based on these facts, it is crystal clear to me that Mitosearch does not contain much data for Native American mtDNA.

This simply suggests that Native Americans of the mtDNA X haplogroups generally are reticent about publishing or going public with their personal data. I've met many people (including non-Natives), who are fearful of doing so, for whatever reasons. It is their right to choose, and I don't judge anyone for it, because it is perfectly understandable. (I, on the other hand, personally refuse to fear anything other than God Almighty.)

The defining marker for my present haplogroup classification, T119C, is not found in any of the European X haplogroups listed there. Is it seen in any Native American groups? That question remains unanswered.


While I do not fit exactly into the haplogroup, W1-T119C, it just happens to be the closest match for me based on the current, common mtDNA classifications. On Family Tree DNA, which analyzed my samples, I currently have only 7 matches (which includes the two I mentioned above that are also listed in Mitosearch), and those have shown up just fairly recently, after I completed further testing. For years, I had none, zero matches. Then one or two popped up, which have since been removed. And as seen above, none are exact matches.

The closest match on the list, "MB", with a genetic distance of "1", is from a very old, colonial American family --- much like the paternal side of my own tree, which very reasonably may also carry some Cherokee blood (a completely separate issue, as I'm concentrating here on my mtDNA / maternal lineage, with the aim to prove that it is indeed genetically Native American).

I figure "MB" is probably a maternal cousin of some sort. Likewise, my more distant matches are likely more distant, maternally related cousins.

What has brought me here, is the brick wall I keep running up against, while tracing my maternal lineage. I can't get beyond my gg-grandmother, Cely Bird. I know nothing about her parentage or siblings, or very much of her marital history, other than the facts of her marriage to Steven Hilburn (my gg-grandfather) and evidence of a possible previous marriage to a man named Powers.

The Powers, Hilburns, and Birds were all fairly prominent North Carolina families, in those days. Hilburn is sometimes spelled Hilborn or Hillborn. Their daughter (my g-grandmother) Polly Hilburn's name was misspelled "Dolly" in the marriage books. Polly married George Washington Elkins. Remarriage was very common in those days, as now. However, then it was more often due to death rather than divorce.

Certain 'helpful' genealogists have dared suggest directly to me, that Cely Bird's real surname was Powers. But that is nothing more than false, speculative, conjecture. If you want to learn the facts about a family, ask the family -- don't go to self-appointed "authorities".

If that were true, if Cely Bird's maiden name was really Powers -- where did "Bird" come from? My grandmother didn't just hatch that up from some wild daydream. And she didn't just decide one day to fantasize being American Indian, a persecuted minority. Get real. Anyone who knows my grandmother (and she was quite well-known in her community), would trust her word over that of any stranger to the family. Hell, anyone could LOOK at her, and see the woman (along with her closest family members of past generations) is Cherokee. But she's gone now, so I am left here to defend her and my family, alone.

There are photographs and other evidence, including family testimonials, but the best clue I have is my mtDNA. So, I would be very interested in studying the specific genetic markers for the various "Native American X" haplogroups. But where is that information? It's hidden, that is the problem. Apparently that is some sort of shady State Secret. And that's very unfair to people like me: people whose Native American ancestors "assimilated" into the general society. People whose Native American ancestors married "outsiders".

There is a very rational explanation why I can't find any documentation for my gg-grandmother (Cely Bird), gg-grandfather (Steven Hilburn), and their parents and siblings. It likely either never existed, or has since been destroyed, perhaps deliberately. But that doesn't mean they didn't exist. They existed, and still do -- in my genome.

There are never any good or innocent reasons for intentionally with-holding the truth and covering up facts, especially from your own family. There is never any justification for denying or stealing a person's rightful identity, their family history --- just because you decide to 'disown' them for some petty reason: greed, politics, power.

That's why I am so open and forthright. I have moral standards, learned from my elders. Fear NOTHING, other than God Almighty himself. I know the truth; but I can't stand all the deceit, all the unnecessary confusion, the outright lies.

I would like to begin with the Windover, Florida, Bog People raw data. Where is it? I need to know.

Here is another paper regarding the Norris Farms site:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002929707615389

Awesome! The following paper, published in full, c2015, reports haplogroup X among the ancient mtDNA of particularly significant Mound Peoples (remember, Cherokees were originally Mound-builders, too). X was rare, even then. And while I am not an exact match, I do share the 16189C marker with those individuals. The finding of X is in itself, very encouraging, but also the fact that they're still looking at ancient lineages. Bravo, keep up the good work!

https://pqdtopen.proquest.com/doc/1752116929.html?FMT=ABS

https://pqdtopen.proquest.com/pubnum/3742824.html?FMT=AI

I'm still waiting for Windover Bog site information, nevertheless. I will never forget what happened there. It is unconscionable, what they did.

My most recent, revised certificate from FTDNA:


Tuesday, November 28, 2017

"DNA Story for [Me]", on My Ancestry Account


I captured this image from my Ancestry account, under the title, "DNA Story for [my name]". It's been ages since I last logged on there, since I thought there wasn't much more to learn from it. But this is different, this wasn't there before. First time I ever laid eyes on it. And I certainly wasn't notified about it, that I'm aware of. I just stumbled onto it.

Curiously, while according to this the highest fraction of my genome is ethnically "Native American", Native American is not included in the fancy pie chart they provided me on my front/main DNA results page. I had to dig a little further to find this: I had to click on "See all 150+ regions" (following "Ethnicity Estimate", which shows a far more simplified version that excludes "Native American"), so I guess Native American / North American is not a region that is normally included in the 'regular' "Ethnicity Estimate".

I was not the least bit surprised to see it there, since I'm fully aware of my family history; but just wondering why, with the number being the highest of all, it isn't included on the pie chart.

I'm sure they have good reasons for not making my Native American ancestry more apparent at this juncture. If they didn't have good reason, they likely wouldn't have revealed it anywhere at all, ever (as before).

So I suppose this is just a reflection of specific technical improvements in their database. And if that's the case, I hope they will continue to honestly and seriously study the puzzle of Native American genetics. It has been far too mysterious for far too long now. Not just because I'm proud of my family, and know that they deserve to be identified correctly, if at all -- but more so because I believe there are profound things for everyone to learn from it.

Not shown in the above graphic (because I was unable to capture it within the frame), is a single hit for East Asia, and another single hit for "Middle East". And that's the sum total of my ethnic profile, according to Ancestry.

Here is the page that led to my surprising discovery (I clicked on the link at the bottom of the list):


I must also point out that the migration charts showing settlements in the Carolinas and other Southern U.S. states, is quite accurate for my direct maternal lineage. It also happens to be the region where my Indian ancestors were from. Granted, these migration charts supposedly cover my entire genome's ethnicity; however, the Native American fraction of 30% is pretty significant, for someone whose most recent (known) full-blooded ancestors were my mother's, mother's, mother's parents. Which means that my mother's, mother's, mother was probably full-blooded as well. In other words, my g-grandmother. And I happen to have a photograph of her, by the way, with her children and husband (a gift to me from her grandson, my uncle). Her appearance could easily pass for Cherokee. Not to mention her personality, lol.

And here is the very simplified pie chart that Ancestry has conspicuously placed front-and-center, on the DNA results page of my account. From my Ancestry Homepage, I click on "DNA" to get here. Then to get to the other charts, I click on the link at the bottom ("Discover Your DNA Story"). Clicking on "+ 7 Other regions" takes you to the exact same place. So, two different links on the pie chart, both leading to the "Ethnicity Estimate"; which then furnishes a further link to the page titled "Ethnicity", where I found what I consider to be a nice Christmas present, the reference to my Native American heritage, about which I have unfortunately been handed a lot of grief by a particular type of low-life:


For good measure, here's a more thorough capture of the chart in question (at the top of this blog post). Although it still doesn't include every visible ethnic category on Ancestry's list, it does however include the two I alluded to earlier, which I inadvertently omitted from the first capture. So in my case, it presents a completely relevant report, of sorts:


I've often been fairly concerned about the accuracy of online, commercialized DNA testing sites. But this latest development is very encouraging. I now feel confident that it was money well-spent. I would recommend anyone who has Native American family history, who has been systematically and perhaps callously denied your God-given heritage and true identity -- to give it a try. I personally think the validation is worth the trouble and expense. See what happens, be adventurous; as I rode the crest of the wave from early on, it shouldn't take you as long as it did for me, to get the answers you seek. And I would be pleased to hear from you, afterwards.

Monday, April 24, 2017

My Family Tree DNA Full Sequence Mitochondrial Analysis Report

 
 
Here is the data given me by Family Tree DNA, which I'm currently comparing with that from James Lick. Both sources have categorized my mtDNA as most closely resembling W1-T119C. However, mine has two missing markers and six extras, so I'm not quite sure but I think it means I'm in-between or belong in my own unique group or clade. However, unless the phylotree gets further updating, with my data included, I have to be content with the present conclusion.

 
 
"There are numerous other W1 lineages without enough results yet to receive a subgroup designation. As is the case with the non-Finnish, W1a's, W1b's, and W1e's, these all seem to be north European maritime lineages, perhaps descended from a basic W1 lineage in the eastern Baltic Sea around 4,000 years ago.

"One branch sharing the 119 mutation in HVR2 spread to territories on the Baltic and North Atlantic, and Bay of Biscay. Ancient DNA results show W+119 was present in Germany 7300 years ago, in burials of the LBK culture. Finds of the same type continue in the later Schöningen, Salzmünde, and Bernburg cultures through 5000 years ago.

"One sharing the 16295 mutation arose around 3,000 years ago and is found today in the Netherlands and the British Isles."
 
 
 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/FJ472633
This is the link directly tied to the T119C mutation.

http://www.phylotree.org/tree/X.htm

http://www.phylotree.org/tree/N.htm

http://www.phylotree.org/tree/index.htm

 
 
 
This explains my unusual mutations:
 
"MTDNA Mutations

"The most common mutations are a change in a letter at a location to its complementary letter - A to G, G to A, C to T, or T to C.

"Next most common are insertion of an extra letter. These are represented in your results by a dot, followed by the number of insertions. For example, 315.1C - meaning an extra C was inserted after 315C; or 315.2C - meaning two extra C's were inserted after 315C.

"Deletions can also occur, where a letter in the sequence is missing. These are indicated by a dash, for example 16183-.

"Occasionally the test results show 'heteroplasmy' - meaning the mtdna in your cells shows multiple results for the same position. This can happen because a single cell contains hundreds of thousands of mtdna copies, groups of which may have mutated and have different letters at the same location; and your results are based on the average for many millions of cells, some of which may all contain a certain mutation, while others are unchanged. These ambiguous results are indicated by the letters Y (C or T - example 16093Y); R (A or G - example 16034R); M (A or C - example 16183M); W (A or T - example 16189W); N (G or A or T or C - example 16192N). U, S, M, K, V, H, B, D, and X are also used to indicate other combinations of results for the same location."
 



 
 

James Lick's Full Report for My Full Sequence Mitochondria Results

My results are from Family Tree DNA; this report came from James Lick's website. I suppose I should have posted the entire report the first time, but I thought I could keep it brief instead. It seems it isn't that simple, after all.
 
mthap version 0.19b (2015-05-11); haplogroup data version PhyloTree Build 17 (2016-02-18)
raw data source XXXXXX-FASTA.fasta (16KB)
FASTA format was uploaded. Based on the markers found, assuming the following regions were completely sequenced: HVR1 (16001~16569) HVR2 (1~574) CR (575~16000).
Found 16569 markers at 16569 positions covering 100.0% of mtDNA.

 
Markers found (shown as differences to rCRS):

HVR2: 73G 118C 119C 189G 195C 198T 204C 207A 263G (315.1C)
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16103R 16189C 16223T 16278T 16292T 16295T (16519C)

 
Best mtDNA Haplogroup Matches:
1) W1(T119C)
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1(T119C):
HVR2: 73G 119C 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1(T119C) (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 119C ⇨ W1(T119C) 118C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Good Match! Your results also had extra markers for this haplogroup:
Matches(31): 73G 119C 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Extras(6): 118C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

 
2) W1
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1:
HVR2: 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1 (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Good Match! Your results also had extra markers for this haplogroup:
Matches(30): 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Extras(7): 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

 
2) W1i
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1i:
HVR2: 73G 119C 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 5580C 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1i (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 119C ⇨ W1(T119C) 5580C ⇨ W1i 118C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Imperfect Match. Your results contained differences with this haplogroup:
Matches(31): 73G 119C 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Mismatches(1): 5580T
Extras(6): 118C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

 
2) W1c
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1c:
HVR2: 73G 119C 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14148G 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1c (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 119C ⇨ W1(T119C) 14148G ⇨ W1c 118C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Imperfect Match. Your results contained differences with this haplogroup:
Matches(31): 73G 119C 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Mismatches(1): 14148A
Extras(6): 118C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

 
3) W
Defining Markers for haplogroup W:
HVR2: 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 7864T 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Good Match! Your results also had extra markers for this haplogroup:
Matches(29): 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Extras(8): 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 7864T 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

 
3) W1h
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1h:
HVR2: 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16145A 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1h (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 16145A ⇨ W1h 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Imperfect Match. Your results contained differences with this haplogroup:
Matches(30): 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Mismatches(1): 16145G
Extras(7): 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

 
3) W1f
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1f:
HVR2: 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 9950C 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1f (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 9950C ⇨ W1f 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Imperfect Match. Your results contained differences with this haplogroup:
Matches(30): 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Mismatches(1): 9950T
Extras(7): 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

 
3) W1g
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1g:
HVR2: 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T 16320T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1g (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 16320T ⇨ W1g 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Imperfect Match. Your results contained differences with this haplogroup:
Matches(30): 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Mismatches(1): 16320C
Extras(7): 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

 
3) W1e1
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1e1:
HVR2: 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8659G 8860G 8887G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T 16295T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1e1 (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 8659G 8887G ⇨ W1e 16295T ⇨ W1e1 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T (16519C)

Imperfect Match. Your results contained differences with this haplogroup:
Matches(31): 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T 16295T
Mismatches(2): 8659A 8887A
Extras(6): 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T (16519C)

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Mitochondria DNA Haplogroup W1-T119C Confirmed

It had been strongly suggested that my mtDNA haplogroup was W1e, and until I updated myself with more elaborate testing, I couldn't really argue with that assessment. However, I now have confirmation from both Family Tree DNA and James Lick's mtDNA Analysis Tool: I'm definitely W1-T119C. Of course, I suspected as much, because my two matches in the database prior to my upgrade are both the same haplogroup. With the upgrade, I now have five matches (one replacing one of the original two individuals, for some reason). None of them seem very familiar to me, except one has Cranfield (an unusual surname) listed in their family surnames. However, for me Cranfield / Crankfield is a surname exclusive to my paternal lineage. So that doesn't quite add up here.

El Cid's Wilma webpage (Ian Logan, I believe) states: "Ancient DNA results show W+119 was present in Germany 7300 years ago, in burials of the LBK culture. Finds of the same type continue in the later Schöningen, Salzmünde, and Bernburg cultures through 5000 years ago."

James Lick's report was interesting and very thorough as usual:

mthap version 0.19b (2015-05-11); haplogroup data version PhyloTree Build 17 (2016-02-18)
raw data source XXXXXX-FASTA.fasta (16KB)
FASTA format was uploaded. Based on the markers found, assuming the following regions were completely sequenced: HVR1 (16001~16569) HVR2 (1~574) CR (575~16000).
Found 16569 markers at 16569 positions covering 100.0% of mtDNA.


Markers found (shown as differences to rCRS):

HVR2: 73G 118C 119C 189G 195C 198T 204C 207A 263G (315.1C)
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16103R 16189C 16223T 16278T 16292T 16295T (16519C)


Best mtDNA Haplogroup Matches:
1) W1(T119C)
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1(T119C):
HVR2: 73G 119C 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1(T119C) (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 119C ⇨ W1(T119C) 118C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Good Match! Your results also had extra markers for this haplogroup:
Matches(31): 73G 119C 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Extras(6): 118C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)


2) W1
Defining Markers for haplogroup W1:
HVR2: 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W1 (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 7864T ⇨ W1 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Good Match! Your results also had extra markers for this haplogroup:
Matches(30): 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 7864T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Extras(7): 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)


3) W
Defining Markers for haplogroup W:
HVR2: 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G
CR: 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C
HVR1: 16223T 16292T

Marker path from rCRS to haplogroup W (plus extra markers):
H2a2a1(rCRS) 263G ⇨ H2a2a 8860G 15326G ⇨ H2a2 750G ⇨ H2a 4769G ⇨ H2 1438G ⇨ H 2706G 7028T ⇨ HV 14766T ⇨ R0 73G 11719A ⇨ R 12705T 16223T ⇨ N 189G 709A 5046A 11674T 12414C ⇨ N2 195C 204C 207A 1243C 3505G 5460A 8251A 8994A 11947G 15884C 16292T ⇨ W 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 7864T 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Good Match! Your results also had extra markers for this haplogroup:
Matches(29): 73G 189G 195C 204C 207A 263G 709A 750G 1243C 1438G 2706G 3505G 4769G 5046A 5460A 7028T 8251A 8860G 8994A 11674T 11719A 11947G 12414C 12705T 14766T 15326G 15884C 16223T 16292T
Extras(8): 118C 119C 198T (315.1C) 7864T 16103R 16189C 16278T 16295T (16519C)

Clearly, it is the 119C mutation on my DNA which distinguishes it from both W and W1. My W1-T119C haplogroup has no more relationship to W1e than to most other W subclades, apparently. It is a direct offshoot from W ---> W1. The 7864T mutation differentiates both W1-T119C and W1 from W. My six extra mutations not ordinarily associated with W1-T119C include at least four markers for X, most likely because my mtDNA is supposed to be Cherokee (according to family history). The Genographic Project originally reported my mitochondria as "X", and I still have the certificate to prove it.