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Monday, September 19, 2016

Windover Data

I've long been disappointed at the dearth of available data and discussion of the Windover, Florida, archeological site. Today, I ran across a trove of references to the subject, which I will link here. Hopefully I'll find more in future. One reason I'm so interested in this matter, is that I believe there is a good chance I'm somehow related to those remains. I've already found myself well connected to other ancient DNA, including the Clovis, Montana, specimen.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/2430186
Nature, "Anatomical, cellular and molecular analysis of 8,000-yr-old human brain tissue from the Windover archaeological site", c1986, by G.H. Doran, D.N. Dickel, W.E. Ballinger, Jr., O.F. Agee, P.J. Laipis, and W.W. Hauswirth.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/2686462
AJPA, "Severe neural tube defect syndrome from the Early Archaic of Florida", c1989, by Dickel and Doran, of Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, Tallahassee.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/1968708
AJHG, "Amerindian mitochondrial DNAs have rare Asian mutations at high frequencies, suggesting they derived from four primary maternal lineages", c1990, by T.G. Schurr, S.W. Ballinger, Y.Y. Gan, J.A. Hodge, D.A. Merriwether, D.N. Lawrence, W.C. Knowler, K.M. Weiss, and D.C. Wallace, of Department of Biochemistry, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Full text free online (pdf).

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/1828940
AJPA, "Can paleopathology provide evidence for compassion?", c1991, by K.A. Dettwyler, of Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/2000147
Nature, "Ancient HLA genes from 7,500-year-old archaeological remains", c1991, by D.A. Lawlor, C.D. Dickel, W.W. Hauswirth, and P. Parham, of Department of Cell Biology, Stanford University, California.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/8020619
Experientia, "Inter- and intrapopulation studies of ancient humans", c1994, by W.W. Hauswirth, C.D. Dickel, D.J. Rowold, and M.A. Hauswirth, of  Department of Immunology and Medical Microbiology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/8644877
AJPA, "Bone remodeling rates and skeletal maturation in three archaeological skeletal populations", c1995, by S.D. Stout and R. Lueck, of Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia.

http://europepmc.org/articles/PMC1915132
American Journal of Human Genetics, "mtDNA variation in the Yanomami: evidence for additional New World founding lineages", c1996, by R.D. Easton, D.A. Merriwether, D.E. Crews, and R.E. Ferrell, of Department of Human Genetics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.

This article is not specific to Windover, but is significant nevertheless, and the full text is available to read for free online (pdf).

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/9837837
AJHG, "mtDNA haplogroup X: An ancient link between Europe/Western Asia and North America?", c1998, by M.D. Brown, S.H. Hosseini, A. Torroni, H.J. Bandelt, J.C. Allen, T.G. Schurr, R. Scozzari, F. Cruciani, and D.C. Wallace, of Center for Molecular Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Full text is free to read online (pdf).

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/9545408
AJHG, "mtDNA analysis of a prehistoric Oneota population: implications for the peopling of the New World", c1998, by A.C. Stone and M. Stoneking, of Department of Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania.

Full text free to read online (pdf).

http://europepmc.org/articles/PMC1692451
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, series B, Biological Sciences, "Analysis of ancient DNA from a prehistoric Amerindian cemetery", c1999, by A.C. Stone and M. Stoneking, of Department of Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

Although this article actually focuses on more than 200 specimens from Norris Farms No. 36 cemetery, Illinois -- the full text is available to read for free online (pdf).

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/10091252
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, series B, Biological Sciences, "Freezer anthropology: new uses for old blood", c1999, by D.A. Merriwether, of Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Full text available to read for free online (pdf).

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/12209570
American Journal of Physical Anthropology, "Differential skeletal preservation at Windover Pond: causes and consequences", c2002, by C.M. Stojanowski, R.M. Seidemann, and G.H. Doran, of  Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/16352716
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, "An Asian origin for a 10,000-year-old domesticated plant in the Americas", c2005, by D.L. Erickson, B.D. Smith, A.C. Clarke, D.J. Sandweiss, and N. Tuross, of Laboratory of Analytical Biology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/17308814
Memorios do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, "Gauging differential health among the sexes at Windover (8Br246) using the Western Hemisphere Health Index", c2006, by R.K. Wentz, B. Tucker, J. Krigbaum, and G.H. Doran, of Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/18324644
AJPA, "Brief communication: physiological stress in the Florida Archaic-enamel hypoplasia and patterns of developmental insult in early North American hunter-gatherers", c2008, by J.C. Berbesque and G.H. Doran, of Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/21302267
AJPA, "Talon cusp from two archaic period cemeteries in North America: implications for comparative evolutionary morphology", c2011, by C.M. Stojanowski, K.M. Johnson, G.H. Doran, and R.A. Ricklis, of Center for Bioarchaeological Research, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/21994018
AJPA, "New evidence on the spatiotemporal distribution and evolution of the Uto-Aztecan premolar", c2011, by Stojanowski, Johnson, Doran, Ricklis, and K.O. Miyar, of Center for Bioarchaeological Research, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/25363296
AJPA, "Observer error, dental wear, and the inference of new world sundadonty" c2015, by C.M. Stojanowski and K.M. Johnson, of Center for Bioarchaeological Research, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Arizona.

So, many of the articles cited above are available to read for free online. Except the ones I really want to read (the two Nature articles and the Experientia article).

Aah, maybe this will help:
https://search.ufl.edu/web/#gsc.tab=0&gsc.q=windover

Monday, September 12, 2016

Harappa World function
 
I'm discovering so many fun applications on the GedMatch website! Chromosome paintings are my present distraction. Eurasia K11 CHG-NAF Admixture Proportions (Caucasus Hunter-gatherer / Neolithic Anatolian Farmer) makes me look somewhat exotic, with just miniscule Amerindian and considerable Kalash, among others. The majority is West Eurasion Hunter-gatherer, Caucasus HG, and Neolithic Anatolian Farmer... Zero Papuan, whew.
 
World9 Admixture Proportions picked up small but significant Amerindian genes. I'm still puzzled by the fact that they don't show the amount I would expect in my genome. But I can only attribute that problem to the issues surrounding getting the N. American tribes to cooperate in genetic studies. One can hardly blame them, though.
 
MDLP World-22 Admixture Proportions is picking up small but significant amounts of north Amerindian and Samoedic, along with the usual. I wish the links would work, because the chromosome paintings are so dramatically graphic.
 
 
puntDNAL K10 ancient admixture proportions also picks up small but significant proportions of Amerindian.
 
Anyway, I'm still exploring, and there's so much to learn from these many different ancestry calculators, that I can't comment on every one of them. And the links don't work, so I have to leave it at that. But I can tell you it is a lot of fun, and very interesting.
 
Here's my chromosome painting of Eurogenes K36, lol. The resolution is poor, but it doesn't matter much anyway, as there is too much information to process anyway:
 
 
"...(The best admixture calculators at Gedmatch are: Dodecad World9, Eurogenes K13, MDLP World-22, Eurogenes K36 or in some cases HarappaWorld). For a great guide on using Gedmatch tools and other third-party sites to find Native American DNA, please read The Autosomal Me – Rooting Around in the Weeds Using Third Party Tools Posted by Roberta Estes section on Gedmatch.com."
 
 
I've progressed to using the Stanford University Esquilax tool. It just pronounced me "CEU" (Caucasoid European). That was on the Hapmap 2 function. This tool must be used in Google Chrome.
 
 
 
Hapmap 3 gave me interesting results. It presents my genome as being mostly TSI (orange, Toscani Italian), GIH (purple, Gujarati Indians in Houston, Texas), and MEX (green, Mexican). Since I have virtually no Spanish or Hispanic ancestry on any other test, I take it the Mexican must be Meso-American. The Gujaratis are East Indians, lol. Oh my, how did I get so exotic?
 
 
 
Hapmap 3 results
 
Good news! I only have six Neanderthal alleles in my genotype. I guess that means my autosomes, since that is what I uploaded here. I'd like to run my mtDNA through the same function, if it will allow it.
 
 
This is pretty amazing, considering how "European" I am.
 
Positive Selection estimate
 
This is me on Hapmap World
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

 
 
This comparison of my own autosomal DNA to that of various archaic samples is very intriguing. Mind you, this is a very, very limited sampling, with just two from North America. My DNA hardly resembles that of Kenniwick Man. But look at Clovis, Montana (12.5 kya). And most of my really close matches are quite old, including the one in Siberia (45 kya, the oldest sample shown here).
 
 
 
 
"Wouldn't this make Ust'-ishim similar to Amerindians, who also are more similar to East Asians, WHG, and Mal'ta (i.e., "ANE") than they are to Stuttgart (i.e., "EEF")?

"My goodness, German [Dziebel] is going to have a field day with these findings..."
 
 
"similar to Amerindians"
 
 
 
 
"The first complete genomic sequence from a Native American was presented by Rasmussen et al.. The individual, called Anzick-1, was associated with Clovis artifacts and is about 12,600 y old. The Anzick-1 sequence is closer to present-day Native Americans than it is to any non-American group, and hence the population to which it belongs is either directly ancestral to present-day Native American populations or very closely related to their direct ancestors. Rasmussen et al. also reported that there was a deep branch separating present-day northern Native American populations from those of southern North America and South America."
 
 
It also happens to be one of my best matches.
 
GedMatch North Amerind function
 
Other than the ancient DNA comparison, they've not been very good at picking up the Native American blood that I'm suppose to have. I know my family: they're very reliable and I don't believe for one moment that they were mistaken at all. I also saw a photograph of my gg-grandmother. She was definitely Cherokee. God, how I wish I'd taken that picture when it was offered me, so I could post it here. But my sister got it, and lost it.
 
It's showing little dabs of Arctic Amerind and South American Amerind. So frustrating.
 
 
This K10 ancient DNA function picked up 1.70 percent Amerindian. Am I getting warmer?
 
 
This African DNA only calculator parses out the finer details of that little dab of "North African" that showed up on my Eurogenes 23 analysis. My African DNA, what little bit I have, is overwhelmingly Western Semitic.
 
The East Semitic languages consist of the extinct Eblaite and Akkadian languages, while the remaining majority of Semitic languages form the West Semitic languages grouping. It consists of the clearly defined sub-groups: Ethiopic, South Arabian, Arabic and Northwest Semitic (this including Hebrew, Aramaic and Ugaritic). The first two, Ethiopic and South Arabian, show particular common features, and are often grouped together as South Semitic.
 
It's probably impossible to pin down, but I would guess Hebrew / Aramaic / Ugaritic... Or quite likely Phoenician...
 
Ancient Eurasia K6
 
This chart is of very poor resolution, and for some reason it won't click into a separate window... but let me see if I can get this right. It shows, approximately:
 
44 % -- West European Hunter-gatherer
36 % -- Natufian (something I've never heard of before, it is an ancient Levant culture)
18 % -- Ancestral North Eurasian
 
 
 
 
 

Note that this utility requires the input file to be unzipped. If a zipped file is provided, the utility may appear to freeze.

File to be processed: dna-data-2016-09-06.zip

ROHs of length at least 200 will be reported.
No-Call runs of length at least 10 will be reported.
No-Calls will be treated as homozygous.
Heterozygous SNPs that are at least 150 SNPs away from the nearest heterozygous SNP will be treated as homozygous.
Note that this utility requires the input file to be unzipped.  If a zipped file is provided, the utility may appear to freeze.

File to be processed:  AncestryDNA.txt

ROHs of length at least 200 will be reported.

No-Call runs of length at least 10 will be reported.

No-Calls will be treated as homozygous.
Heterozygous SNPs that are at least 150 SNPs away from the nearest heterozygous SNP will be treated as homozygous.

Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 12 from position   2655180 to position   2655371 ( 0.19 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 17 from position   2655436 to position   2669716 (14.28 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 21 from position   2697625 to position   2756519 (58.89 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 17 from position   2837192 to position   2888392 (51.20 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 10 from position   3199276 to position   4716925 (1517.65 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 24 from position   6635162 to position   6796065 (160.90 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 21 from position   6846615 to position   6894819 (48.20 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 18 from position   6931809 to position   6976734 (44.93 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 11 from position   7035520 to position   7087279 (51.76 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 10 from position   7134120 to position   7162736 (28.62 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 23 from position   7401585 to position   7611416 (209.83 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 17 from position   7626710 to position   7697222 (70.51 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 28 from position   7801788 to position   7989319 (187.53 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 15 from position   8020092 to position   8149348 (129.26 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 76 from position   8194310 to position   8714022 (519.71 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 25 from position   8758629 to position   9376415 (617.79 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 20 from position   9417393 to position   9968357 (550.96 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 24 from position  13864428 to position  14140277 (275.85 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 14 from position  14149772 to position  14231555 (81.78 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 13 from position  14245444 to position  14345705 (100.26 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 12 from position  14491671 to position  14515265 (23.59 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 58 from position  14734176 to position  14922817 (188.64 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 10 from position  14968449 to position  14994820 (26.37 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 29 from position  15014550 to position  15043778 (29.23 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 44 from position  15116138 to position  15467824 (351.69 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 42 from position  15469740 to position  15668070 (198.33 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 13 from position  15779994 to position  15842844 (62.85 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 16 from position  15980942 to position  16202544 (221.60 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 14 from position  16213100 to position  16315153 (102.05 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 12 from position  16331558 to position  16404607 (73.05 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 11 from position  16519057 to position  16601300 (82.24 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 45 from position  16849994 to position  17201259 (351.27 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 12 from position  17275043 to position  17353144 (78.10 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 12 from position  17389379 to position  17436200 (46.82 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 13 from position  17446588 to position  17510373 (63.79 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 13 from position  17537643 to position  17614366 (76.72 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 15 from position  17782178 to position  17912084 (129.91 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 20 from position  17936279 to position  18066156 (129.88 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 13 from position  18097249 to position  18180446 (83.20 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 10 from position  18394634 to position  18600862 (206.23 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 17 from position  18617596 to position  18747493 (129.90 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 23 from position  18759669 to position  18927898 (168.23 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 42 from position  19033817 to position  19244931 (211.11 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 14 from position  19255890 to position  19375294 (119.40 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 21 from position  19469989 to position  21100759 (1630.77 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 10 from position  21117888 to position  21242391 (124.50 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 10 from position  21253443 to position  21288728 (35.29 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 22 from position  21385724 to position  21570974 (185.25 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 82 from position  21590100 to position  21784286 (194.19 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 87 from position  21801722 to position  22072340 (270.62 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 11 from position  22094491 to position  22191144 (96.65 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 14 from position  22214221 to position  22601068 (386.85 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 44 from position  22634764 to position  22843448 (208.68 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 15 from position  22866703 to position  22944601 (77.90 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 17 from position  22968980 to position  23069523 (100.54 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 11 from position  23156865 to position  23248930 (92.07 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 25 from position  23383729 to position  23791923 (408.19 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 15 from position  23801764 to position  24366649 (564.89 Kb)
Chr  Y has a No-Call run of length 11 from position  24401940 to position  28538592 (4136.65 Kb)

Chr  1 has a ROH of length   223 from position  45742914 to position  45978675 ( 0.24 Mb)
Chr  1 has a ROH of length   259 from position 156083468 to position 156108924 ( 0.03 Mb)
Chr  2 has a ROH of length   784 from position  47520035 to position  47780865 ( 0.26 Mb)
Chr  2 has a ROH of length   655 from position  48009816 to position  48461993 ( 0.45 Mb)
Chr  2 has a ROH of length  1279 from position 179396885 to position 179582853 ( 0.19 Mb)   (2 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Chr  2 has a ROH of length   591 from position 179586698 to position 179649461 ( 0.06 Mb)   (1 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Chr  2 has a ROH of length   279 from position 215574279 to position 215888624 ( 0.31 Mb)
Chr  3 has a ROH of length   476 from position  38513431 to position  38659795 ( 0.15 Mb)
Chr  5 has a ROH of length   300 from position 131801726 to position 131953510 ( 0.15 Mb)
Chr  5 has a ROH of length   257 from position 176541937 to position 176833020 ( 0.29 Mb)
Chr  6 has a ROH of length   880 from position  30193577 to position  30940387 ( 0.75 Mb)   (1 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Chr  7 has a ROH of length   217 from position 117170943 to position 117199533 ( 0.03 Mb)
Chr  7 has a ROH of length   559 from position 117218381 to position 117476763 ( 0.26 Mb)
Chr  7 has a ROH of length   232 from position 134013464 to position 134944544 ( 0.93 Mb)
Chr  9 has a ROH of length   219 from position  34637265 to position  34677857 ( 0.04 Mb)
Chr  9 has a ROH of length   527 from position 135616700 to position 135849248 ( 0.23 Mb)
Chr 11 has a ROH of length   210 from position  76861379 to position  76918426 ( 0.06 Mb)
Chr 13 has a ROH of length  1790 from position  32894738 to position  32915344 ( 0.02 Mb)   (1 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Chr 13 has a ROH of length   666 from position  32929242 to position  32956757 ( 0.03 Mb)   (2 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Chr 14 has a ROH of length   409 from position  23885041 to position  23898990 ( 0.01 Mb)
Chr 16 has a ROH of length  1267 from position   2088585 to position   2199788 ( 0.11 Mb)
Chr 16 has a ROH of length   417 from position  23607079 to position  23713813 ( 0.11 Mb)   (1 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Chr 16 has a ROH of length   462 from position  68713730 to position  69000588 ( 0.29 Mb)   (1 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Chr 17 has a ROH of length  1683 from position  41173086 to position  41246476 ( 0.07 Mb)
Chr 17 has a ROH of length   463 from position  41246482 to position  41462229 ( 0.22 Mb)
Chr 19 has a ROH of length   205 from position   1192769 to position   1250109 ( 0.06 Mb)
Chr  X has a ROH of length   283 from position  98446580 to position 100127101 ( 1.68 Mb)
Chr  X has a ROH of length   406 from position 100563546 to position 102663922 ( 2.10 Mb)
Chr  X has a ROH of length   277 from position 149537834 to position 149943008 ( 0.41 Mb)
Chr  X has a ROH of length   248 from position 153294996 to position 153297142 ( 0.00 Mb)
Chr  X has a ROH of length   511 from position 153546556 to position 154229403 ( 0.68 Mb)   (1 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Chr  Y has a ROH of length  1691 from position   2655180 to position  28817458 (26.16 Mb)   (2 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous)
Total Mb:  36.37

The following percentages are for individual homozygous SNPs, not just those in lengthy ROHs.

Chr  1:  70.171 % (35519 of 50618 SNPs) are homozygous,    44 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  2:  70.999 % (37247 of 52461 SNPs) are homozygous,    56 No-Calls,   3 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  3:  69.895 % (28705 of 41069 SNPs) are homozygous,    37 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  4:  67.399 % (24160 of 35846 SNPs) are homozygous,    37 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  5:  70.579 % (27050 of 38326 SNPs) are homozygous,    35 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  6:  70.495 % (28876 of 40962 SNPs) are homozygous,    59 No-Calls,   1 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  7:  70.704 % (24760 of 35019 SNPs) are homozygous,    34 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  8:  67.943 % (21381 of 31469 SNPs) are homozygous,    35 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  9:  69.696 % (20570 of 29514 SNPs) are homozygous,    27 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 10:  69.291 % (22550 of 32544 SNPs) are homozygous,    37 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 11:  71.538 % (23164 of 32380 SNPs) are homozygous,    29 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 12:  70.265 % (22347 of 31804 SNPs) are homozygous,    40 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 13:  71.739 % (17553 of 24468 SNPs) are homozygous,    28 No-Calls,   3 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 14:  70.766 % (14817 of 20938 SNPs) are homozygous,    16 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 15:  71.141 % (14687 of 20645 SNPs) are homozygous,    18 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 16:  73.575 % (17561 of 23868 SNPs) are homozygous,    28 No-Calls,   2 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 17:  74.123 % (17310 of 23353 SNPs) are homozygous,    22 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 18:  70.418 % (13240 of 18802 SNPs) are homozygous,    17 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 19:  73.055 % (11908 of 16300 SNPs) are homozygous,    21 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 20:  70.669 % (12061 of 17067 SNPs) are homozygous,    17 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 21:  69.333 % ( 6744 of  9727 SNPs) are homozygous,    10 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr 22:  70.676 % ( 7392 of 10459 SNPs) are homozygous,    10 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous

Chr  X:  78.067 % (22555 of 28892 SNPs) are homozygous,    31 No-Calls,   1 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr  Y:   1691 SNPs,  1557 No-Calls,   2 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
Chr XY:    525 SNPs,     1 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous
mtDNA :    195 SNPs,     0 No-Calls,   0 heterozygous SNPs treated as homozygous

Total autosomal (Chr 1-22):   0.103 % (   657 of 637639 SNPs) are NoCalls
Total autosomal (Chr 1-22):  29.490 % (188037 of 637639 SNPs) are Heterozygous (this tally excludes 9 heterozygous SNPs that were treated as homozygous)
Total autosomal (Chr 1-22):  70.510 % (449602 of 637639 SNPs) are Homozygous   (this tally includes 9 heterozygous SNPs that were treated as homozygous)
Processing Completed.
 
 
My eye color is a bit unusual. Although most people read and report it as "brown" (as it is on my ID, etc.) -- I see it as a dark green / dark amber / brown combination. Kind of an Olive green.  And this analysis proves I'm not just imagining things, lol.
 
"No shared DNA segments found...No indication that your parents are related." Whew! That's good to know.


Finally got around to getting my autosomes analyzed... Here's what they look like on Eurogenes 36.

Eurogenes K13
 
Hunter-gather vs. Farmer
 
J-test
 
Eu-test
 
Eu-test, V2, K15
 
Eurogenes ANE K7
This test is supposed to gauge the amount of ancient north Eurasian ancestry.
 
Eurogenes K9b
 
This is the only one so far, that has picked up even the slightest amount of native American for me.  It also includes ancestry suggesting to me at least of having some part of my native American ancestry (Asian and African).
 
K9
 
K10
 
K11
...essentially an upgraded version of the EUtest. Unlike the original, it includes an Amerindian component and five native reference populations from North and Central America. So obviously it should be a lot more useful for users from the New World who are wondering about Amerindian admixture.
 
K12
 
K12b
 
That seems to cover the Eurogenes analyses.
 
 
 
 

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Charges Dropped, Case Dismissed (Again)

This makes the second time my oppressors have failed to have me unjustly punished, only for the sake of boosting their faulty egos.  I'm grateful to God and to the local Courts which so far have granted me merciful justice.  But I can't keep defending myself all alone against those monsters.  I have a life I need to live, and things I need to do for survival and Happiness (like, recover from this life-threatening, chronic Aspergillus infection -- my top priority).
 
I don't have a copy of the motion to dismiss with me today; but I'll definitely make an effort to reproduce it here for the record, before too long.  It's only one page this time (not eight, like the first time); so it shouldn't be too difficult a task for me.
 
Okay, here it is:
 
If it please the court, I would move that this case be dismissed, based on the following:
 
  • That the law in question, Section 42-10 of Ocala, Florida municipal codes (Ord. No. 2013-5, SS 1, adopted 11-20-12, retitled SS 42-10 from "Trespass" to "Trespass and Unlawful Lodging."  State law reference---Trespass, F.S. ch.810.) may easily be proved unconstitutional; and,

  • That anyway, I personally have not ever been in violation of the ordinance as it is written anyhow; and,

  • That there is also ample evidence to suggest that the arresting officer (who refused to identify herself, so I don't know her name -- but whose badge number I believe is either 89 or 98, and of course I can describe her too) systematically and over a long period of time (months) has targeted, harassed and stalked me, seeking to arrest me, and to cause me pain and suffering, and to effectively ban or have me banned from virtually every area laundry, so as to make it very inconvenient or nearly impossible for me to do my wash like any other citizen.
 
[Besides this motion to dismiss the case, I'd also filed a motion to postpone due to illness, and a statement of intent to be informed of all evidence used against me (Discovery).]