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Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Vernon Winters Denman, Etc., Details from Archives.com

1920 CENSUS RECORD

Marion County, Florida; U.S. Federal Population Census, Line 61

MEMBERS IN HOUSEHOLD:

Isaac [Isaiah Cranfield] Denman, father, 41 yrs. old [first name mis-spelled in the original record]

Lilly [Virginia] Denman, mother, 35 yrs. old [first name mis-spelled in the original record, I think]

Vernon W[inters] Denman, son, 13 yrs. old, male, white, American
  • born ~1907
  • single
  • can read and write
Forest C. Denman, son, 11 yrs. old, male, white, American
  • born ~1909
  • single
  • can read and write
Shirley Denman, daughter, 8 yrs. old, female, white, American
  • born ~1912
  • single
  • can read and write
88888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888
 
 
1930 CENSUS RECORD
 
Reddick, Marion County, Florida, US Federal Population Census, Line 34
 
MEMBERS IN HOUSEHOLD:
 
Isaiah C[ranfield] Denman, father (head of household), 50 yrs. old, born ~1880
  • Enumeration District: 42-7
  • Born in Florida
  • Father born in Georgia
  • Mother born in South Carolina
  • Language: English
  • Married
  • White
Lillie [Virginia] Denman, mother (wife), 44 yrs. old, born ~1886
  • Enumeration District: 42-7
  • Born in Florida
  • Father born in Florida
  • Mother born in Florida
  • Language: English
  • Married
  • White
Vernon W[inters] Denman, son, 24 yrs. old, born ~1906
  • Enumeration District: 42-7
  • Born in Florida
  • Father born in Florida
  • Mother born in Florida
  • Language: English
  • Single
  • White
Forest C. Denman, son, 21 yrs. old, born ~1909
  • Enumeration District: 42-7
  • Born in Florida
  • Father born in Florida
  • Mother born in Florida
  • Language: English
  • Married
  • White
Shirley Denman, daughter, 19 yrs. old, born ~1911
  • Enumeration District: 42-7
  • Born in Florida
  • Father born in Florida
  • Mother born in Florida
  • Language: English
  • Single
  • White
Reba Denman, daughter-in-law, 18 yrs. old, born ~1912
  • Enumeration District: 42-7
  • Born in Florida
  • Father born in Florida
  • Mother born in Florida
  • Language: English
  • Married
  • White

88888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888
 
1940 CENSUS RECORD
 
Vernon W[inters] Denman, father (head of household), 34 yrs. old, born ~1906
  • Enumeration District: 42-4
  • Born in Florida
  • Residence: Ward 3, Ocala, Election Precinct 1, Marion County, Florida
  • Language: English
  • Married
  • White
  • American
Lilly L. Denman [Lillie Yarbrough], wife, 25 yrs. old, born ~1915
  • Enumeration District: 42-4
  • Born in Florida
  • Residence: Ward 3, Ocala, Election Precinct 1, Marion County, Florida
  • Language: English
  • Married
  • White
  • American
Leon C[onway] Denman, son, 4 yrs. old, born ~1936 [1935 is the correct year of Dad's birth]
  • Enumeration District: 42-4
  • Born in Florida
  • Residence: Ward 3, Ocala, Election Precinct 1, Marion County, Florida
  • Language: English
  • Single
  • White
  • American
Patricia K. Denman, daughter, 2 yrs. old, born ~1938
  • Enumeration District: 42-4
  • Born in Florida
  • Residence: Ward 3, Ocala, Election Precinct 1, Marion County, Florida
  • Language: English
  • Single
  • White
  • American
88888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888
 
According to Florida Marriage records (Florida Marriage Index, p222), on Archives.com, Vernon Winters Denman was married in 1934, in Hamilton County, Florida.  The town of Jasper, Florida, is in Hamilton County; and was occasionally mentioned by my father.
 
In the 1940 census, it appears from the map provided by Archives, that Vernon and Lillie's family (with their two children, my father and aunt) lived in the North end of Ocala, towards Anthony, I guess.
 
This looks like about all I could get, for my $8.00 investment:  s-o-s that I already knew, and could easily find online already.

 
http://truthfreedom-shenandoah.blogspot.com/2012/01/systematic-medical-abuse-and-malicious.html

http://truthfreedom-shenandoah.blogspot.com/2011/12/denman-family-history-from-my-point-of.html

Ok, I've already discussed the mysterious and suspicious circumstances surrounding my grandfather's, Vernon Denman's, death at the age of 38 yrs. old, in 1943, when my father was only 8 yrs. old.  His gravestone seems to have the correct date, but the wrong year of death on it (the stone says 1950, and that is not even close to what my father related to me of the story of Vernon).
 
For some unknown reason, he was supposedly incarcerated at the "Florida state mental hospital in Arcadia" -- which if so, would be G. Pierce Wood Memorial Hospital, a psychiatric facility.
 
 
However, to add more confusion to the story, this Wikipedia article claims that G. Pierce Wood only opened in 1947 -- taking over Carlstrom Field airbase after it was de-commissioned in 1945.  (Ironically, my father, Leon, later served in the US Airforce for nearly ten years.)
 
This article also seems to corroborate the opening of the hospital in 1947.
 
"'The town needed it for people to have work to do, because about all that was here was orange picking and farming,' she said.  'It just kind of boosted the town up.'"

So, the locals saw the hospital less as a means for helping people with mental issues, as it was a means to boost the Economy, apparently.  Yes, most people in Florida were dirt poor in those days, in the years immediately following the Great Depression and WWII.







"The hospital sits on more than 100 acres, 7 miles out of Arcadia. Some say that 7 miles has helped, in the same way good fences make good neighbors."

It sits on the same site that was originally Carlstrom Field, from 1917-1945.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#Home_fronts_and_production
According to Wikipedia, World War II ran on from 1939-1945.

So, if my father was correct and telling the truth (I've never known him to lie, and rarely has he been wrong) -- Vernon died in 1943, at Carlstrom Field (which only later became a psychiatric facility), during WWII, reportedly of "suicide" -- by "poisoning", no less (according to my father, he died from ingesting iodine -- a substance which I'm sure was quite commonly found in all medical facilities during that era).

But if that is the case, why did my father believe that Vernon died at G. Pierce Wood psychiatric facility?  Was it because the hospital sat on the same site as the Air Base?  I'm very confused.

My father showed me Vernon's grave, at Millwood cemetery, on at least 2-3 occasions -- the last time being in the company of his second wife, Shellee.  This is his grave marker, which was only added to his final resting place around fifty years after his actual death and burial:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=31355820&PIpi=21861701

 
Now, when Dad took me to see Vernon's grave at Millwood in Reddick, Florida, I saw a sunken grave with no stone to mark it; however, it did have a small generic marker -- like a metal stake, with a place on it for storing official identifying information (name and dates, etc.).  Surely, it did not say that his death year was 1950 -- because if so, my dad would have pointed out the discrepancy to me, between the year on the stake marker and the year that my dad believed his father had died.

My dad was a very intelligent man, with sharp senses and an excellent memory.  Yes, he endured a great deal of childhood trauma, but I don't see how he could be mistaken about his age and circumstances at the time of his father's passing.  He told me that he had been informed of the tragedy after being pulled out of his third grade class, at age eight... Folks, that was in 1943.

... I need Vernon's actual death certificate, and all documentation concerning his life between the years of 1940 (the last mention of him alive, at the regular US Population Census that year) -- and the actual year of his death, whenever it was.  Bear in mind, that presumably there was a Census in 1950, too.  However, that one isn't readily available to read online, that I'm aware of.

Personally, I would be incredibly shocked if my father's story was incorrect about the date of his father's death.  If so, it would have to be only because he was misled or lied to about it.  I can't believe there would be any other reason for the discrepancy... And there was the grave-marker, too -- so I just can't see how they ended up with "1950" on that stone.  I'm certain that stone was added to the grave, after my own father's death, in 1988 (? give or take one year, I'll have to verify that).

Another minor(?) detail: my grandmother, Lillie Yarbrough Denman Armstrong, lost both her husband and her own father -- to poisoning.  I don't know whether or not it is significant, but while Vernon supposedly died of "suicide" by ingesting iodine (and according to my father, he had attempted it once prior to being institutionalized -- leading one to suppose that might have been the actual reason for his hospitalization in the first place)...

... Lillie told me that her father (whose name and history I know practically nothing about, because she didn't talk much about such things) -- had died of accidental poisoning by bootlegged whiskey.  So both, Grandma's father and young husband, died of poisoned beverages.  Weird.  Is it coincidence?  I don't know; Grandma certainly seemed like a nice, gentle lady -- certainly not a criminal.  I don't mean to cast aspersions on her; I really don't know what to believe and haven't got nearly enough evidence one way or another, but I just need to understand what really happened with those two men, both of whom were my ancestors.

Ok, Vernon's wife, my grandma Lillie L. Yarbrough, was born March 2, 1915, and died June 13, 2006, according to the Social Security Death Index information listed on Archives.com.  And, that does sound correct to me.

However, I haven't been able to locate anything about her marriages, yet.  And I don't really know whether Vernon's death made her a widow, or if they had already divorced by that time.  I recall my father saying they were at least separated, but I'm not sure if that's right.  He was very young when his dad died, which understandably would have made it very difficult for him to be completely 'in the know' about every detail of his parents' personal lives, the state of their marriage, etc.

Another thing I should probably point out:  although my father was always very courteous and respectful toward his mother, Lillie Armstrong, I never got the sense that they were very close, on an emotional level.  There was a certain cool distance between them.  On the other hand, Lillie was on warmer terms with her sister, Geogia ("Georgie") Hampton, and with her daughter, Patricia ("Pat") Barker.

Perhaps that might be explained by the different treatment my father received after Vernon's death:  while little sister, Pat, went to stay with Aunt Georgie on the Hampton homestead in Marion County, Florida -- Leon was taken to Atlanta to live with his mother, evidently after a failed brief marriage to a man called, "Mr. Armstrong".

I don't know what happened in Atlanta, but it somehow resulted in my father going to Foster Care, specifically as a ward in the home of the future Congressman, Bill Chappell's, mother.  After a fairly short and unhappy time in her care (he was homesick and missing his family), he eventually joined sister Pat at the Hampton farm.  The whole experience left him feeling rejected and degraded, unwanted.

To his credit however, he never became evil, mean, or vengeful because of it.  He was always very gentlemanly and loving toward his family, despite his true feelings which he conveyed to me as he related the story of his youth.  He was a very sensitive, thoughtful, yet masculine enough, [Hu]man.

I just wish that he had lived longer, and not died so young.  Not only would he have enjoyed learning so much more about his family's history, but I'm sure he would have provided help in solving the more puzzling aspects of our history.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida_State_Hospital
An interesting brief history of Chattahoochee, the only other "Florida State Psychiatric Facility", to my knowledge.  This is not where my father told me Vernon was committed; and is in the opposite direction from Ocala.  So, there's still no end to the confusion.

From what I could gather of the story, Vernon was institutionalized not for any crime he might have committed, but for the simple alleged act of "attempted suicide".  If indeed he was hospitalized after an alleged suicide attempt, it begs the question:  what was his physical and mental condition at time of intake?  For all I know, he might have been comatose, a virtual invalid, by that time.  If so, then he obviously could not have testified in defense of himself, in order to explain how he arrived in that situation.

http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/yarbrough/pats
(Vernon's wife's, Lillie's, maiden name was Yarbrough.)

http://archive.org/stream/statementofexcha00phelrich#page/n3/mode/2up
http://archive.org/stream/unitedstatesship00unitrich#page/n3/mode/2up
A William Denman of California, protested some sort of business practices in 1917, involving the Military and Ship manufacturers, Steel companies... or, something to that effect.  I've seen newspaper articles about the same incident, wherein it was reported that Mr. Denman lost his job after blowing the whistle on them.  I wonder if he stepped on the wrong (ie, Illuminati, Mafia) toes?


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